The Sugar Alphabet: 54 Different Names for Sugar

May 12, 2014 § 20 Comments

You’d think there’d be a good online reference for all the Sugar Aliases out there, wouldn’t you? One that’d tell you ALL those different names for Sugar-With-A-Capitol-“S”, (which is to say ingredients that contain extracted fructose, ie: the BAD GUY in sugar). And there are some sugar-name lists, but, I’ll venture to say, perhaps none as comprehensive as this one.

One big problem is that many of the Sugar Name lists out there fail to distinguish between sweeteners that contain fructose and those that do not– thereby committing the unforgivable sin of lumping innocent and lovable brown rice syrup in with such metabolic evils as crystalline fructose! (Can you imagine?)

In compiling this new comprehensive list, many of the terms I already knew, but some I had to research further. I hope you appreciate all the articles I had to read with titles like “The Biological Synthesis of Dextran from Dextrins,“ and the fact that I now – against my will- know what a structural isomer is. Yes! I did that for you.

So, (insert trumpet fanfare here) here is my Up-To-The-Minute, Pretty-Much-Alphabetized, Family-Sized LIST of Sugars-to-Watch-Out-For:

PS- Find a new sugar name? Send it to me!! I’ll add it.

THE SUGAR ALPHABET (54 different names and counting)

  • Agave
  • Barbados Sugar
  • Beet Sugar
  • Brown Sugar
  • Brownulated Sugar
  • Buttered Syrup
  • Cane Juice
  • Cane Sugar
  • Cane Syrup
  • Caramel
  • Carob Syrup
  • Castor/ Caster Sugar
  • Confectioners Sugar
  • Crystalline Fructose
  • Date Sugar
  • Demerara Sugar
  • Dextran
  • Dehydrated Cane Juice
  • Evaporated Cane Juice
  • Evaporated Cane Syrup
  • Evaporated Sugar Cane
  • Florida Crystals
  • Free Flowing Brown Sugar
  • Fructose
  • Fructose Crystals
  • Fruit Juice
  • Fruit Juice Concentrate
  • Glazing Sugar
  • Golden Sugar
  • Golden Syrup
  • Granulated Sugar
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
  • Honey
  • Icing Sugar
  • Invert Sugar
  • King’s Syrup
  • Maple Sugar
  • Maple Syrup
  • Molasses
  • Muscovado
  • Panocha
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Raw Sugar
  • Refiners’ Syrup
  • Sorghum
  • Sorghum Syrup
  • Sucanat
  • Sucrose
  • Superfine Sugar
  • Table Sugar
  • Treacle
  • Turbinado Sugar
  • White Sugar
  • Yellow Sugar

Not sugar but if I were you I would also avoid:

Sugar Alcohols:

  • Erythritol
  • Isomalt
  • Maltitol
  • Mannitol
  • Sorbitol
  • Xylitol

Artificial Sugar Substitutes:

  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Aspartame (Nutrasweet, Equal)
  • Cyclamate
  • Neotame (Nutrasweet)
  • Saccharin (Sweet n’ Low)
  • Stevia (Truvia)
  • Sucralose (Splenda)

The Good News List!

These sound suspicious, but are more or less fine. They aren’t all necessarily health foods mind you, but they are sweetening agents that contain no fructose.

  • Barley Malt
  • Barley Malt Syrup
  • Corn Syrup
  • Corn Syrup Solids
  • Dextrose
  • Diastatic Malt
  • Diatase
  • Ethyl Maltol
  • Galactose
  • Glucose
  • Glucose Solids
  • Grape Sugar
  • Isomaltose
  • Lactose
  • Malt Sugar
  • Maltose
  • Maltodextrin
  • Rice Syrup

Foods to Watch Out For:

You’ll find sugars in the strangest places, once you start to look. Here are some of the surprising, but very common offenders of hidden sugar (fructose):

  • Crackers
  • Bread
  • Bacon
  • Vanilla
  • Baby Food
  • Baby Formula
  • Salad Dressing
  • Cold Cuts
  • Marinades and Sauces
  • Tortellini
  • Smoked Salmon
  • Chicken Broth
  • Sausages
  • Cereal
  • Breakfast bars
  • Granola bars
  • Nuts
  • Dried Fruit

Foods That Are Generally Safe from Fructose: (it’s a short list, isn’t it?)

  • Cheese
  • Non-flavored Pretzels
  • Non-flavored Yogurt
  • Non-flavored potato chips

 

A Year of No Sugar: Post 22

February 9, 2011 § Leave a comment

“So we are being poisoned by this stuff and its been added surruptitiously to all of our food; every processed food.”

-Dr. Robert Lustig – “Sugar: The Bitter Truth”

You’d think it’d be simple to exclude sugar from your diet, right? Not easy perhaps, but at least reasonably simple. You wouldn’t have to be an Einstein. Just look at the ingredients, and then when you find sugar- don’t eat it. Simple.Yet lately I’ve been running into some ingredients that have been defying my supposedly fool-proof plan. Dextrose for one.

Flashback to last week: for several days I wasn’t feeling so well, and as a result I was behind: behind on my cooking, behind on my shopping, behind on my meal-planning. Somehow we muddled through, but one night when I was feeling particularly desperate, half-ill and starving, I hauled out an industrial size bag of frozen “Bertolli” chicken with cream sauce and bowtie pasta. Okay, the ingredient list was longer than my arm, and appeared to have been at least partially written in some unknown foreign language, but this was a food emergency. At least there was no sugar; I had purchased this on my first “no sugar” BJ’s run a few weeks ago.

Of course, silly me had to double check, which as we have already thus far learned can be a big mistake if you’d like to actually eat anytime in the near future. What I found was within the chicken ingredients of meat, water and seasoning, the first sub-ingredient under “seasoning” was: “dextrose.” Dextrose? %^&*#$!

So you know what? I felt crappy. I was starving. And there was pretty much nothing else in the kitchen at that moment that seemed even remotely appealing. I cut open the bag, dumped it into the non-stick pan, cooked it for the requisite ten minutes and we ate it anyway… dextrose or no dextrose.

Upon completing our meal my first thought was that something was amiss- what was it? I realized it seemed really odd to me how quickly our meal had come together- I mean, a meal like chicken and bow-tie pasta with spinach and cream sauce doesn’t just happen all by itself! How long would a recipe like that normally take me? At least an hour but very likely more, not to mention all the dirty dishes that would result from washing spinach, separately cooking chicken, carefully simmering the cream sauce in a pan while boiling the pasta in another pot.

So it occurred to me that this meal had been sponsored: brought to you by dextrose! (As well as its friends isolated soy protein product and sodium phosphate!) The inverse correlation was very clear: the fewer chemicals and additives, the greater amount of meal prep/ cooking and clean-up time, and vice versa.

But it had also become clear to me that there are so many pseudonyms for sugar and it’s variants that I need to do some homework. When I look up “dextrose” on the internet I find a host of confusing answers: “Better known today as glucose, this sugar is the chief source of energy in the body.” While another advertisers hail dextrose powder as “Corn sugar!” that is “30% less sweet than pure or refined sugar.” So, forgive me for being dense, but which is it? Is it something that we create in our bodies to provide energy, or is it an added sugar?

True confessions time: biochemistry was not my best subject. Can you tell? So what is sugar? What are the differences between terms like sucrose, glucose and fructose? And where the heck does dextrose come in? Are all “ose” words sugar-related? What about bellicose? Today I happened upon a website of diabetes information that listed a frightening amount of “reduced calorie sweeteners” to look out for, without so much as an “-ose” ending to tip us off:

…found primarily in packaged foods such as cookies, gum, and candy. Reduced-calorie sweeteners include sorbitol, mannitol, lactitiol, maltitol, xylitol, isomalt, erythritol, and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates.

Am I the only one who is starting to break out in a sweat just trying to define “sugar” in a list of ingredients? Probably. I don’t know too many other people who would worry whether their food contained isomalt or not.

It’s clear to me that sometimes I’m splitting hairs, because I have to. I put back a box of cereal in the supermarket because it contains “two percent or less” of molasses or cane syrup, and yet how sure am I really that the waitress in the restaurant knows there is no sugar in the tortillas? Did she check for isomalt? Or xylitol? Of course not.

So I’m off to watch Dr. Lustig’s talk “Sugar: the Bitter Truth” for the third time, in hopes of decoding the mystery of the “-ose.”

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with sugar names at Eve O. Schaub.

%d bloggers like this: